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3 days ago

Our MP Steve Barclay and Baroness Jenny Jones plan to meet with us on the 8th Sept and hopefully other parliamentarians. Let us know if you would like to book a coach seat ... See MoreSee Less
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3 days ago

On another Wisbech Facebook site a guy called Ashley Jones sparked a lively discussion after stating that he agreed with the building of the incinerator in Wisbech. He announced this by altering one of our yellow 'No Mega Incinerator' signs. Admin did get him to remove our WisWin logo before allowing the post to stay up. He seemed genuine in his belief, stating that the main reason was that it would reduce landfill, quoting the fact that Japan has a great many incinerators and near zero landfill, and ignoring all the negatives that come with incineration. Not surprisingly he did draw a great deal of opposition with a few shouts of support but I suspect most of these were trolls just trying to wind people up. Also not surprisingly he doesn't live in Wisbech. Anyway I posted a reply stating why people do not want a mega incinerator in Wisbech, explaining why his Japan comparison was not valid and what effective, less damaging policies are being put in place to reduce landfill. For reference here is my reply.One of the major problems for the people of Wisbech with siting a Mega-incinerator here is the increase in lorry traffic converging on this small town that already lacks the suitable infrastructure to cope effectively with its regular traffic. 300 lorry movements per day concentrated between 7 in the morning and 8 in the evening will undoubtedly result in congestion, especially when convoys of lorries meet the morning and afternoon school runs before merging with the twice a day rush hour as people go to and from work. MVV have already stated that some roads will see an increase of 74% in traffic resulting in one lorry every minute. 50 lorries alone will come into Wisbech along the A1101 from Outwell, to the already overburdened Elm roundabout. And, as doubt has now been thrown on the road improvements that MVV claim will help, the prospect of travelling to and from, or even just within Wisbech does not look good. On top of the congestion, air quality will undoubtedly fall which will do no good to the already high incidence of Asthma and COPD in this area.It was interesting that one of the posters made the comparison with Japan which does indeed have a large number of incinerators, however the comparison with the UKโ€™s incinerator industry, as illustrated by the one proposed in Wisbech, is not really valid. In Japan rather than have massive incinerators they have lots of little ones, each serving the town or part of the city where they reside. Typically, the average size of an incinerator in Japan is only capable of producing 1.6 Mw unlike the MVV one proposed here which would generate 50Mw. Most of the incinerator plants will only handle 150-200,000 tonnes of rubbish per year whereas the one proposed for Wisbech will burn a massive 625.000 tonnes per year. Incinerators in Japan usually serve just a single town or just part of a city. This means that rubbish is collected and driven straight to the incinerator by the municipal collection trucks. A typical town incinerator will have 10 lorry loads a day to burn, unlike the 150 required to keep the Wisbech one going.One of the merits of incineration that is often put forward is that it will reduce landfill and thus reduce greenhouse gas emissions from landfill sites. However, this is just replacing one problem with another problem as incinerators will release CO2 from the burning rubbish. So, for example the Wisbech incinerator will release 625.000 tonnes of CO2 per year, a massive amount of greenhouses gas. Incinerators also release large amounts of atmosphere damaging Hydrogen Chloride, Hydrogen Fluoride, Sulphur Dioxide and Nitrogen Dioxide.So rather than burn our rubbish, how can landfill be reduced. Well, the government are well aware, that landfill cannot be relied on for disposing of our waste in the future. That is why they have produced the Environment Bill that is currently passing through Parliament. In a bid to drastically reduce the need for landfill the bill legislates that by 2035 waste management schemes must ensure thatโ€ฆ.1) re-use and recycling of municipal waste is increased to a minimum of 65% by weight.2) the amount of municipal waste landfilled is reduced to 10% or less (by weight) of the total amount of municipal waste generated.Two directives highlighted in the Bill, will impact the most, in reducing the amount of waste available for landfill. They areโ€ฆ.1) That all plastic packaging placed on the market being recyclable, reusable or compostable by 2025; with the introduction of a deposit return scheme for drinks containers. (This will reduce waste for incineration by up to 20%).2) The elimination of all food waste sent to landfill by 2030 by introducing measures to encourage the weekly separate collection of food waste and green garden waste with a view to the composting and digestion of all bio-waste using Anaerobic Digestors. (This will reduce waste for landfill by 25%).The bill is on its final reading in the house of Lords and will be passed to the House of Commons for voting on very soon.So, legislation is in place to drastically reduce the amount of waste going to landfill. Incineration is not the answer as it produces a whole gamut of problems on its own and the monster incinerator proposed for Wisbech would certainly damage the quality of life for those living in the town. ... See MoreSee Less
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20 hours ago

On Saturday it took me 20 minutes to drive from Dehavilland Road to the A47/ B198 junction at the end of Cromwell Road. The main reason for this was the traffic on the B198. This is the supposed main access to the proposed Incinerator site. Mr Carey please note!....๐Ÿš›๐Ÿš›๐Ÿš›๐Ÿš›๐Ÿš›๐Ÿš›๐Ÿš›๐Ÿš›๐Ÿš›๐Ÿš›๐Ÿš›๐Ÿš›๐Ÿš› ... See MoreSee Less
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